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A driver holding a cell phone in his/her hand and using the speaker phone, or as is most commonly seen, holding the cell phone to the ear (whether on speaker phone or not), is against the law.
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A driver holding a cell phone in his/her hand and using the speaker phone, or as is most commonly seen, holding the cell phone to the ear (whether on speaker phone or not), is against the law.

News, Santa Monica, Police Department

Santa Monica Police To Crack Down On Drivers Who Talk Or Text While Driving

Posted Oct. 31, 2012, 2:27 am

Brenton Garen / Editor-in-Chief

The California law on handheld cellphones went into effect in 2008 -- it was one of the first in the nation and the ban on texting followed in 2009.

For the month of November, Santa Monica Police Department's Traffic Enforcement Section motor officers in addition to their normal duties, will focus on drivers who are talking or texting on cell phones.

The Santa Monica Police Department asks everyone to drive responsibly, watch the road and avoid being distracted by pulling to the side of the road before using any handheld device.

What constitutes a violation?

-- A driver (of any age) holding a cell phone in his/her hand and using the speaker phone, or as is most commonly seen, holding the cell phone to the ear (whether on speaker phone or not), would constitute a violations of 23123(a) of the California Vehicle Code.

-- Juveniles are not allowed to use cell phones at all while driving with or without an ear piece, and whether or not on speaker phone.

-- "Write, send, or read a text-based communication" means using an electronic wireless communications device to manually communicate with any person using a text-based communication, including, but not limited to, communications referred to as a text message, instant message, or electronic mail and would constitute a violation of 23123.5(a) of the California Vehicle Code. Scrolling for a name or phone number in a cell phone, or entering a phone number does not constitute texting.

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Comments

Oct. 31, 2012, 4:31:25 am

Manny Bravo said...

Ridiculous. SMPD are always on their phones. They need to practice what they preach, then they will have my respect

Oct. 31, 2012, 5:30:59 am

R. Jones said...

So why after 4 years your just getting around to enforcing the law

Oct. 31, 2012, 8:51:57 am

Richard S said...

It's about time! People on cellphones snarl traffic

Oct. 31, 2012, 9:31:11 am

catherine said...

i see so many people still useing their cells,, and recently i saw a guy texting and he would look down then look up and he was driving,,

Oct. 31, 2012, 10:39:39 pm

Erik Wood said...

Texting is an efficient communications medium, a powerful fund raising tool and even a crime reporting method - to name a few upsides. But I also think technology should be able to help us facilitate unplugging - especially when driving down the highway in 5000 pounds of steel and glass. After my three year old daughter was nearly run down by a texting driver in 2009, I invented an app to manage texting whether the user is at home, in the office or on the road. Its simple and easy to schedule "texting blackout periods" with all notifications silenced so you can focus on the task at hand without feeling disconnected from your social network. Teens can study or sleep and adults...well maybe we can remind ourselves that technology should be complimenting our lives and not the other way around. Erik Wood, owner OTTER app do one thing well... be great.

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